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NBA Injuries

Challenges face the Lakers without Rondo

Hale Thornhill-Wilson

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Just after the Los Angeles Lakers’ nail-biting defeat against the Sacramento Kings last night, further negative, interim news was confirmed that Rajon Rondo will miss at least a month of action with a sprained finger. Rondo suffered the injury during the Warriors game just this past Tuesday. Unfortunately, his finger sprain comes at quite the inopportune time for the veteran, as he had already generated a double-double in the game, prior to the incident. On top of having a myriad of finger issues in the past, the previous, four- time All Star has seen a major decrease in minutes while he plays second fiddle to promising second year point guard, Lonzo Ball.

Ball’s youth, promise, and unique size for a point guard is what keeps Rondo on the bench as the back-up point guard.  However, statistically speaking, Rondo has a standout assist to turnover ratio at 3:1, while Ball’s is a respectable (2.3):1. The skew in ratios is due to Lonzo’s more frenetic, rapid pace which typically correlates to more turnovers, while Rondo is the more methodical, facilitating- first point guard. Though he averages just under 2.0 points a game than Lonzo, Rondo’s percentages from the field are predominately stronger than Ball’s. It’s a prime case of efficiency vs. flashiness here.

Looking forward, this is a great opportunity for Lonzo Ball to showcase his improvement with the extended minutes Rondo has granted him. Look for Lakers to take advantage of Ball’s length and defensive prowess to establish a fast tempo. Ball’s great ability to launch outlet passes ways away and push the ball in the open court will provide a nice pace for the offense. Especially with Lebron out for a bit of time, Laker’s fans will truly see what the second year point guard is able to carry on his shoulders. Ball must keep the turnovers down and wisely chose his attacks to the bucket, so he can create for himself or his teammates.

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Hale played basketball competitively at renowned Loyola High School- all four years. Currently, he's a senior at Duke University with aspirations of working in sports management or finance. Hale is a Philadelphia Eagles fan that also roots for the Los Angeles Lakers and Duke Blue Devils. In his free time, he enjoys golf, fishing, and mixing music.

NBA Injuries

Damian Lillard suffers groin strain

Dr. Marco Lopez

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NBA Injury Alert

Reports are stating that Damian Lillard suffered a groin strain Wednesday night vs the Grizzlies. He will not participate in the All Star game and maybe miss a couple games following the all stargame depending on the severity. We expect CJ McCollum to handle most of the scoring until Lillard gets back. In this article we will go over what exactly is a groin strain and the severity of it.

What is injured in a groin strain?

The groin muscles or the hip adductors are responsible for adducting/bringing the legs together. The groin muscles can be separated into two groups. The first group is the pectineus, adductor longus, and adductor brevis muscles which attach from the pelvis to the femur. The gracilis and adductor magnus attach from the pelvis to the knee. Any injury to these muscles are referred to as a groin strain.

How is it injured?

Groin Strain occur in sports that involve quick acceleration and sudden changes in direction as well as powerful overstretching of the leg and thigh in abduction and external rotation.

A groin strain is a stretching or tearing of the muscle group as a result of overloading the muscles beyond their normal range.

Am I at risk for injury?

Previous groin injury and adductor weakness have been linked to the incidence of adductor muscle strains. Core weakness or delayed onset of transverse abdominus recruitment increases risk of groin injury.

Are all groin sprains the same?

All groin injuries are different and are classified by their severity. They all either are defined as pain during palpation of the adductor tendons or the insertion on the pubic bone or groin pain during adduction against resistance

Grade 1: there is pain but minimal loss of strength and minimal restriction of motion

Grade 2: Tissue damage that compromises the strength of the muscle but not including complete loss of strength and function

Grade 3: Complete disruption of the muscle tendon unity including complete loss of function of the muscle.

How long am I out for?

1st degree: 2-4 weeks

2nd degree: 4-6 weeks

3rd degree: 6-10 weeks

 

Source

Nicholas, Stephen and Tyler, Timothy. Adductor Muscle Strains in sport. 2002.

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